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Green is The New Gold

BY Vicky du Toit

02 August 2017 – The Institute of Waste Management of Southern Africa’s Eastern Cape branch hosted the Green Is The New Gold conference in the splendid World of Windows venue at the Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium.  The conference theme was based on the principle of changing perceptions in terms of considering waste as a valuable resource, “we also recognized that our theme mirrors that of the Springbok team, who are hosting a game later this month,” said Theo von Ruben, Chairperson of the IWMSA EC branch.  The conference hosted nine speakers from diverse backgrounds and offered various forms of entertainment for the delegates.


First to approach the microphone was Rosa Blaauw from the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality, who presented the NMB Stadium’s Environmental Management System and elaborated on the various green initiatives of the stadium, “The establishment of a Recycling buy-back facility at the stadium is one of the key focus areas for the near future, and this will directly benefit the immediate community by creating a value chain for recyclable material,” she reported.


Managing Director, Brian van Niekerk of The Rhino Group followed by discussing House Rhino, which has won International Acclaim with the highlight being a paper written and presented by NMMU at the Seeds Conference in London during 2015.  The paper won the best paper for the conference and has been published in an international journal.  House Rhino was designed to be completely self sustainable, incorporating energy and water saving elements and various green building material and techniques.  Furthermore, Brian discussed the remediation of rivers and dams and the negative impact of human interference in natural bioprocesses, “humans tend to swim upstream, and we need to get back to a place where nature can take its natural course in order to preserve our resources for future generations.”


Walter Fyvie, Senior Associate from the Environmental unit of GIBB, presented the third paper, which discussed the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality Waste Drop-Off Facility Master Plan.  “Illegal dumping is a pressing concern, annually 85 994 tonnes of illegally dumped waste is removed in the NMBM,” Walter further highlighted the need for recycling drop off facilities such as the upgraded Kragga Kamma waste transfer station and he presented the systematic planning process that was used to determine where future drop-off facilities should be located.


The next presentation discussed how technology can help to save the environment.  Vuyo Sikwebu, Managing Director of Clariter ZA elaborated on how Clariter converts plastic waste into high grade chemical fluid using a unique patented process, “by investing in innovative technology, we can not only find solutions to the world’s plastic waste problems but also create employment opportunities.”


Theo von Ruben, owner of ChemSolved followed with an in depth look at waste minimalization in the automotive and component industries.  He elaborated on the various waste streams found in the industry and alternative solutions to landfill, “Most multinationals have a zero-to-landfill policy in place, however, SME’s often experience difficulty in designing and funding a waste management system as good waste disposal information is scarce.”


Lindsay Wayman, Sustainable Development & Communications Officer and Peter Allen, Technical Manager at Oricol challenged delegates to change their perception about waste, “we need to work together to change public perception, waste should be regarded as a valuable resource”, said Lindsay.  Peter followed by discussing their blending plant to produce alternate fuel followed by energy recovery at the cement kiln near Port Shepstone, “the system aids in the recovery of energy and minerals from the waste whilst reducing coal consumption, raw material consumption and diverting waste from landfill.”


Furthermore, Agripa Munyai, Environment Manager at Tetra Pak Southern Africa discussed the recycling value in all the layers of a carton “Tetra Pak cartons are made up of 75% paperboard, 25% low density polyethylene and 5% aluminium.”  He explained that carton is 100% recyclable, “paperboard can be recycled into new paper product and furthermore the aluminum and polymer mix can be used to manufacture roof tiles for low cost housing and industrial roofing.”


Kabega Primary, Nelson Mandela Bay’s top recycling school, ended with a motivational presentation about the school’s various greening efforts.  Dr Adele Botha explained how Kabega Primary started recycling with Project Groenspoor and The Waste Trade Company and the many lessons they have learnt on their journey to success, “a schools recycling project needs green champions to drive the project, it is an absolute team effort that needs support from all of the school’s stakeholders - the principal, teachers, parents, learners and private partners are all key role players.”  She continued to discuss how Kabega Primary has raised funds through recycling and invested in other projects such as green gardening, water saving and solar power.


Following the informative presentations, delegates were treated to a live performance by Emmy Nxayeka, Schools Project Coordinator, The Waste Trade Company who launched a Recycle Rap.  Emmy was accompanied by learners from Kabega Primary and Molefe Primary.  During the event delegates were awarded lucky draw prizes from various sponsors, presented by Miss Earth SA finalist Lauren Giani, enjoyed beer tasting from Bridge Street Brewery and were entertained with live music by the Mad Hatters. 


Interwaste, Kabega Primary, Greencycle, Oricol, The Waste Trade Company, Chemsolved, Noziqhamo Arts and Crafts, EnviroServ, Vic’s Garden Furniture, Timber Solutions and Karoo Kwezi offered exhibitions where delegates had the opportunity to explore solutions to their specific waste needs.


In closing, Southern Kings rugby player, Siyanda Grey, modeled a Springbok Rugby shirt that was auctioned off to delegates, “we would like to thank all parties that played a role in the successful running of the conference, events such as these really showcase the vision and mission of the IWMSA, which includes fostering communication between all stakeholders in the waste industry and promoting the value of waste as a resource,” Theo von Ruben, Chairperson of the IWMSA Eastern Cape Branch.

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 August 10, 2017
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Greening the Grounds at the SPAR Kirkwood Wildsfees

BY Vicky du Toit

The SPAR Kirkwood Wildsfees celebrated its 17th Wildsfees this year.  The festival is an annual event that takes place in the town of Kirkwood, Eastern Cape.  Over 42 000 festival goers enjoyed a medley of food and craft stalls, fun activities and live entertainment.


Mpact Recycling, South Africa’s largest paper recycler, in partnership with The Waste Trade Company, sponsored the waste management and recycling facilities for the festival.  Recycling stations with clearly marked bins were strategically placed on the festival grounds to ensure that festival goers, stallholders and all other role players had convenient access to a recycling bin.  Cardboard Mpact bins were provided for the disposal of non recyclables.  Furthermore, grey water, used oil and food waste bins were provided for stallholders.  “Since the first year of managing the festival’s waste in 2014, we have found that the public are making more use of the recycling facilities.  This year’s bin audits have shown an increase in separation at source, but there is still room for improvement,” said Kay Hardy, General Manager of The Waste Trade Company.


The Waste Trade Company, this year’s winner of the PETCO Best Public Recycling Education Programme, trained 20 learners from Kirkwood’s St Colmcille High School to be Green Ambassadors at the festival.  Their duties included the supervision and clearing of their recycling stations, assisting festival goers to recycle efficiently and promoting recycling along with Mpact’s mascot, Ronnie Recycler.  Emmy Nxayeka, Schools Project Coordinator of The Waste Trade Company supervised the learners for the duration of the festival, “our ultimate goal is to educate the public about recycling whilst keeping the SPAR Kirkwood Wildsfees clean and green!”


The SPAR Kirkwood Wildsfees has diverted a total of 33 011 kg of waste from landfill. According to PRASA, the average global recycling growth rate has been just over 1.5% in the last four years whilst South Africa’s growth rate has increased by 7%.  This proves that even though developed countries have better ease of recycling, South Africa ranks firmly among these markets.  “In South Africa, we still have to go out of our way to recycle, making it harder to improve the country’s recycling rate; however, events such as the SPAR Kirkwood Wildsfees provides us with the opportunity to educate the public about recycling,” says John Hunt, MD Mpact Recycling.

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 August 08, 2017
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2017 Winners of The Best Recycling Public Education Programme in South Africa

BY Vicky du Toit

07 June 2017, Sandton - The Waste Trade Company proudly accepted the award for the Best Recycling Public Education Programme in South Africa, presented by PETCO at their Annual General Meeting, hosted in Sandton.  Speakers included Cheri Scholtz, PETCO CEO, Dr Casper du Randt, PETCO Chairperson, Janine Basson, PETCO Stakeholder Relations Manager and Tshidi Ramogase, PETCO Vice-Chaiperson.  Media Personality, Brent Lindeque, was invited as the guest speaker.  Brent is known for pioneering the #changeonething movement and challenged all attendees to embrace the concept of doing good things in their personal and professional capacity.


PETCO is a national not-for-profit organization that drives post consumer recycling of PET bottles through voluntary funding from PET industry partners.  Their goals include achieving sustainable growth in PET recycling, supporting existing and encouraging new PET collection and recycling networks, and promoting consumer education and awareness programmes.  One of the ways in which PETCO achieves these goals is to recognise the efforts of the people, companies and organizations involved in the PET recycling value chain.


“We would like to extend our gratitude to everyone who nominated us and to PETCO for awarding us,” said Emmy Nxayeka, Schools Project Coordinator, The Waste Trade Company, “this truly inspires us to work even harder to help our clients increase their recycling volumes.  The Waste Trade Company, situated in Port Elizabeth, specializes in Recycling and Waste Management Solutions and The Schools Recycling Project is one of their divisions.


The Schools Recycling Project was established in 2009 and has since grown to service 280 clients in Port Elizabeth, Uitenhage, Despatch and the Sundays River Valley and Adelaide.  The project provides schools, churches and nonprofit organizations with resources, educational and motivational tools to recycle.  Furthermore, they also benefit by receiving a financial rebate for their recyclable material. 


Kay Hardy, General Manager of The Waste Trade Company believes that education is key to ensuring a sustainable future, “in the last 5 years The Schools Recycling project has diverted 2 900 tons of waste from landfill, this has been as a result of various educational initiatives, The Waste Trade Company is committed to the continual support of this project, as our children are our future!” 

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 June 09, 2017
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Triple Bottom Line

BY Vicky du Toit

People, planet, profit – three important ingredients to running a sustainable business.  When considering sustainability, carbon footprints, greenhouse gases and ecosystems come to mind.  However, this is only the environmental aspect of sustainability.  Other important aspects to consider are the social and economic factors.  The Waste Trade Company assists clients by considering the 3BL approach when managing their waste. 


When an efficient recycling programme is introduced, not only will the organisation’s carbon footprint be reduced, but so too will the disposal costs of sending waste to landfill. From a social perspective, recycling can assist an company in building valuable relationships with the surrounding community by partnering with a local school, church or nonprofit organisation. 


The Waste Trade Company assists by collecting recyclables from the organisation, and donating the financial rebates to the chosen institution.  “Relationships are key in the current fast paced business environment, and we consider our staff and clients to be part of our Waste Trade Family,” says Kay Hardy, General Manager of The Waste Trade Company.  


TWTC would like to congratulate the top three recycling schools in Port Elizabeth for the first term of 2017.  Kabega Primary took the lead by collecting 9516kg of recycling from January to March 2017.  Dr Adele Botha is the driving force behind the success of the recycling project at school, “we plan to use the prize money toward upgrading our toilet facilities, in order to use less water per flush, this way we can further reduce our environmental impact,” Dr Botha further advises schools to involve their school principal, personnel, parents and the local communities, “the more people are involved, the bigger the impact.”


Kwezi Lomso won second place by recycling a total of 6198kg for the first term of 2017.  Mr Kona, manager of the school’s basketball team, The Kwezi Lomso Rangers (who also refer to themselves as The Green Rangers), is very proud of his team’s efforts, “As Kwezi Lomso Comprehensive School, we are proud to be a part of this moving train.  It has been a blessing to us as we are a no fee school.”  The school’s basketball team took on the responsibility of running the recycling project at school, “ever since the team introduced the school to TWTC, we no longer need financial assistance for transport as the funds from recycling assists with this.” 


In third place, with a total of weight of 3789kg, is Mount Pleasant Primary.  Corne Oosthuizen, a school parent, is the green ambassador promoting this recycling project at school, “Identifying a Recycle-Team or an Eco-Club is key in the success of a schools recycling project.  Furthermore, resources are needed to store the recycling.  TWTC has also played a valuable role in our success, as they provide consistent service and are always available when we need advice.”

 

“Each year, Mpact Recycling sponsors prize money to the value of R 24,000 to TWTC’s Schools

Recycling Project. The programme, in its 8th year, has proved extremely successful in promoting the importance of recycling to the youth in Port Elizabeth, Uitenhage, Despatch and The Sundays River Valley area.” says Donna-Mari Noble, Communications Manager, Mpact Recycling. “Recycling is vital to ensuring our lovely country does not end up a rubbish site. We sit with a very serious issue in South Africa that in the not too distant future, most of our landfills will have to be closed due to over capacity. The change that all these schools programmes have, including the Mpact Ronnie Recycler programme, around the country will certainly go a long way in educating the recyclers of tomorrow.”

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 May 16, 2017
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IWMSA Grass Roof Tour

BY Vicky du Toit

?Friday, 12 May 2017 – The Institute of Waste Management of Southern Africa hosted a breakfast networking event at the Grass Roof on the outskirts of Port Elizabeth.  Members enjoyed a brief history of the Grass Roof, presented by , Nicky Charlewood.  Thereafter, Grant Dryden founder and CEO of Bountiful Grains Trust shared guidelines to composting and gardening by using the Farming God’s Way technique. 


Since opening its doors in 2013, Grass Roof has become somewhat of a landmark and attraction for Port Elizabeth, with its pitched roof layered in grass and wild flowers.  The Charlewoods, who had bought Olive Tree Farm in 1994, aimed to produce as organically as possible and wanted to open a restaurant that would fit in with the natural environment, “we aim to continuously improve our greening efforts to further cut our carbon footprint whilst providing our visitors with nutritious food and a delightful experience surrounded by nature,” says Nicky Charlewood, “furthermore, we have built a new section made from recycled containers, which can also be used for events.”


Farming God’s Way is a nonprofit organization that aims to alleviate poverty by sharing organic gardening and farming principles with their stakeholders.  Grant Dryden, founder and CEO of Bountiful Grains Trust, recognized that the current man made farming system isn’t long term sustainable and so introduced the technique called Farming God’s Way.  “The technique is based on minimal interference with the natural processes,” says Grant, “we don’t plough, we have a minimal approach to soil disturbance and we practice biodiversity.” 


Grant introduced the Farming God’s Way technique to Mike Charlewood in 2015. Since then many of the tunnels and shade cloth area on Olive Tree Farm has been utilized for planting using the technique, and a training centre has been established on the Grass Roof’s premises, “it really has been a blessing working with the Grass Roof team, if they see that something works, they get right on it!”  Grant has also introduced the technique at Van Stadens Flower Farm School, St Albans Primary and Yellowoods Primary where the schools now provide fresh produce to the poor, elderly and the ill and the balance they are able to sell for much needed school funding.


Following the presentation, Grant led the IWMSA members on a guided tour of Olive Tree Farm, where they could see the Farming God’s Way technique in action, “information sessions such as these expose our members to other facets of waste management, and even during the tour of the farm we were able to identify opportunities to support this initiative,” says Theo von Ruben, Chairperson of the IWMSA Eastern Cape Branch. 


Concluding the tour, members enjoyed a networking session whilst having a nutritious breakfast, Kay Hardy, General Manager of The Waste Trade Company and coordinator of the event was pleased to see how local relationships have grown, “most of our members now know each other by name, and by having regular networking sessions such as these we are able to strengthen ties with key stakeholders, which in turn assist our members in providing their clients with top quality service.” – Vicky du Toit, Marketing Manager, The Waste Trade Company.

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 May 15, 2017
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Your cool drink bottle is not trash, and here is why

BY Mpact Recycling SA

Considerable progress has been made to increase the recycled portion of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) in the manufacturing of new plastic bottles. An increase in the percentage of Recycled PET (rPET) bottles is conditional upon two things: improving the industry’s capacity to recycle (which has been achieved by Mpact Polymers PET recycling operation); and by improving the quality of PET being processed in the operation. By consumers ideally separating recyclables at source, they can ensure that the bottles don’t end up in landfills as part of the municipal waste collection process which ultimately prevent them from becoming too contaminated to be recycled. With the formal sector’s increased investment into new recycling capacity, Mpact Polymers operation accounts for 85 direct jobs and indirectly, an anticipated 1,000 additional jobs are expected to be created within the recycling industry. This would be as a result of a greater demand for collectors, small businesses and buy-back centres. 

 

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 February 13, 2017
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Tips from NMBM’s Top Recycling Schools

BY Vicky du Toit

The Schools Recycling Project, run by The Waste Trade Company, was implemented in 2009 and has since grown to service over 280 clients in Port Elizabeth, Despatch, Uitenhage, Colchester, Kirkwood and Addo.  The majority of these clients being schools, but churches and nonprofit organizations are welcome to participate as well. 
 
The Schools Recycling Project aims to empower children with the knowledge and principles of recycling by involving them in various ‘hands on’ educational activities.  Furthermore, it offers schools with a fun extracurricular activity at no cost, and it can even generate funds for the school!  The project is based on the following principle:  “Tell me and I’ll forget, show me and I may not remember, involve me and I’ll understand.” 
 
The project has shown considerable growth in the last 4 years, 2016 being the year with the highest average volumes per month.  “Anyone who follows us is aware of all the exciting initiatives we have to motivate all participants to recycle.  We believe that our future lies in the hands of our children, and therefore we are committed to making this project sustainable,” says Kay Hardy, General Manager of The Waste Trade Company.
 
“We are so excited to kick the year off with our top recycling schools,” says Emmy Nxayeka, Schools Project Coordinator of The Waste Trade Company, “looking back at 2016, in one year all of our schools managed to save an average of 8800 trees!!!”
 
Kabega Primary, recent winner of Plastic SA’s Clean-up and Recycle Competition and winner of their category for The Top Green Organisations Awards, carried the winning flag for being the top recycling school in Port Elizabeth for the last term of 2016 once again.  They managed to collect a total of 12990kg of recyclables!  “Kabega Primary has truly made us proud, and we look forward to supporting them in their future endevours,” says Howard Bulkin, owner of The Waste Trade Company.  Mr Andrew Jonas, principal of Kabega Primary mentioned that he would be interested in having Kabega’s learners visit one of the other top recycling schools, and would be happy to invite them to visit Kabega too, “I think it would be a good opportunity to offer the learners an opportunity to learn from each other.  Thank you to Mpact for the R3000 prize money, we will plough this back into all our green projects at school.”
 
New entrant, Molefe Primary, won second place for the last term of 2016, with a total weight of 5738kg of recyclables.  “What, we came second?!” exclaimed a very surprised Mrs Nomalunga Kwatsha, a school teacher and the organiser of the enviro club, “wow, we are so happy!”  Principal Xola Rasi was very grateful for the R2000 prize money, donated by Mpact Recycling SA, “the money will help us relieve our paper shortage, so we can start the year on a good note,” Mr Rasi also advised other schools on how to make a recycling project work; “motivation and education is key, remind and encourage the learners, and involve the parents!”  Molefe Primary also manages their own vegetable garden, which is used toward meals for the learners.  They intend keep winning in order to purchase a water tank for the school. 
 
Uitenhage based school, Albertyn Primary, won third place with a total weight of 4533kg.  The school won a cash prize of R1000, donated by Mpact Recycling SA.  “We worked very hard to collect and sort all our recyclables, especially in December, we had a whole classroom full,” says Mrs Huiskens, teacher and coordinator of the recycling “but you are only as strong as your team, many hands make lighter work”.  With the help of The Waste Trade Company, the school plans to upgrade their recycling facilities so that they can start fresh with the new enviroclub learners this year. 

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 January 16, 2017
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The Eastern Cape Top Green Organisation Awards

BY Vicky du Toit

East London - The Eastern Cape Top Green Organisation awards were celebrated on the 17th of November at The Venue, Hemmingways Hotel.  Honourable MEC Mr S. Somyo from the Department of Economic Development, Environmental Affairs and Tourism, delivered the message of the day, "the awards bear testimony to the incredible work done by both public and private enterprise".


The biennial awards aim to recognise the efforts of those who invest in maintaining best environmental practice.  Entrants are applauded for finding innovative solutions to reduce their carbon footprint and for educating their surrounding communities about responsible resource management.


The award categories include large organisations, medium organisations and small organisations.  Sub categories are measured according to environmental impact.


This year The Waste Trade Company maintained their position in first place for medium organisations with a low environmental impact.  Furthermore, they won a platinum award for scoring above 90% for their environmental audit.  They also shared their success with four of their clients, Goodyear SA, General Motors South Africa, Bridgestone South Africa and Kabega Primary, who also received awards for their environmental efforts. Howard Bulkin, owner of The Waste Trade Company, commended the efforts of all who were involved in achieving these accolades, "we are proud of the role we play in the success of our clients, we believe that teamwork is of utmost importance in achieving our clients' goals. We are very proud of our platinum award, which serves as confirmation of the standards that we adhere to."


In the large organisations with high risk, Goodyear SA won 1st place and received a platinum award.  Freddy Xoli accepted the award.  Goodyear SA has maintained their zero-to-landfill status since 2008.


GMSA won second place in the same category.  The platinum award was accepted by Huldah Solomon.


Laura Vorster from Bridgstone accepted the gold award for winning 3rd place in the category for medium organisations with a high environmental impact.


The top recycling school in Port Elizabeth, Kabega Primary, won first place in their category.  The award was accepted by Dr Adele Botha.  Dr Botha and her team of Groenspoor Prefects have set a stellar example with regards to implementing an environmental policy at school.


Deidre Nxumalo-Freeman, lead auditor, presented the awards for the evening, "The Eastern Cape Top Green Organisation Awards has given entrants the opportunity to measure their environmental impact, and even more so, to explore opportunities for improvement.  We can clearly see the positive impact in the audit scores of our top winners."

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 November 24, 2016
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Teamwork Makes the Green Work

BY Vicky du Toit

SPAR Colchester hosted their second annual SPAR Colchester Village Cleanup on the 19th of November, 2016.   The local community as well as Colchester Primary's learners all gathered at the community hall where children were registered and welcomed.


Children were split into groups to clean 10 streets within the village, each with an adult supervisor.  Approximately 270 people attended the event and 380 bags, donated by Plastics SA, were filled with litter!


The purpose of the cleanup campaign is to raise awareness about the environmental impacts of pollution and the benefits of recycling.  Furthermore this is an opportunity for SPAR Colchester to reach out to the local community.  Michael Vlok, General Manager of SPAR Colchester,  is very passionate about community upliftment, "The day is about getting the community together, having a fun morning, teaching children to do something constructive, giving them something to eat and putting a smile on their face."


Spar colchester signed up with TWTC to recyclable their cardboard and plastic 5 months ago.  Michael's plans also include setting up a public recycling station to offer the local community an opportunity to recycle, "we are committed to supporting our community and environment and will continue to invest in events such as these.  We only have one planet, and it is our responsibility to take care of it."


Emmy Nxayeka, Schools Project Coordinator from The Waste Trade Company, was seen collecting all the filled bags in the streets with the bright Schools Recycling Project vehicle, "the children love to help fill up the recycling truck, and it serves as yet another educational tool", she concluded the event with an educational talk about the importance of preserving the earth's natural resources by recycling.


The Waste Trade Company commends Michael and his team from SPAR Colchester for their environmental efforts, "we look forward to joining forces to pursue further green growth in the Colchester community," says Kay Hardy, General Manager of The Waste Trade Company.

 

Back Row, Left to Right:
Philasande Mnqwenelwa (TWTC), Lihle Mbebe (TWTC), Bulelani Mashushu (TWTC), Emmy Nxayeka, (Schools Project Coordinator, TWTC), Michael Vlok (General Manager, SPAR Colchester)
 
Back Row, Left to Right:
Johann Vlok (10), Ricado Plaatjies (8), Jade Nortjie (9), Jessica Vlok (9)

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 November 19, 2016
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Reduce Your Carbon Footprint this Festive Season

BY Vicky du Toit

The end of the year brings with it a big opportunity to recycle.  Everyone is filing, archiving and cleaning out cupboards and storerooms to make space for the new year.

 

These efforts often generate huge amounts of waste paper - not to mention the extra packaging from festive season celebrations!

 

BELOW ARE A FEW TIPS TO GO GREEN THIS FESTIVE SEASON:

The Early Bird Catches the Worm - Start cleaning up sooner rather than later.  Spring cleaning can become rather a daunting task, don't leave it for the last day!

 

Failing to Plan is Planning  to Fail - Set up a storage area, with separation at source facilities.  This will ensure that double work is avoided.  Plan to clean an office or a classroom a day.

 

Teamwork Makes the Dream Work - don't be afraid to ask for assistance.  Cleaning out does not have to be a chore, it can even be treated as a team building effort!

 

Waste Not Want Not - Festive season shopping can amount to a lot of additional packaging.  Remember to use your own shopping bags and buy products in recyclable packaging.

 

Turn Your Spoil Into Soil - Instead of throwing away your food waste, why not start a compost heap or buy a worm farm?  Planting your own vegetable garden is a great way to spend time together as a family!

 

Do Something Creative - Reuse your waste to make fun arts and crafts.  Learn to knit with plastic bags, these make great gifts!

 

Spread the Green Gospel - Remind your friends and family about the importance of recycling...better yet - collect recyclables from whoever you visit.

 

Think Outside The Box - There are many ways to have a fun filled and blessed holiday whilst considering your environmental impact.  Be innovative this festive season, and let your green light shine!

 

Book your recycling collection by contacting The Waste Trade Company!

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 November 08, 2016
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Drop Off Points for Paper Recycling

BY Vicky du Toit

Please take note that it would be best to contact the below clients directly to establish when there paper banks are accessible, as some of these might be locked up after hours.


Booysens Park

  • Booysens Park Primary School

Charlo

  • Charlo Primary

Chatty

  • Bethelsdorp Road Primary

Cotswold

  • Moregrove Primary

Gelvandale

  • Chapman High
  • Gelvandale High

Helenvale

  • Helenvale Primary

Kabega Park

  • Kabega Primary

Lorraine

  • BP Circular Drive
  • Brylin High
  • Lorraine Primary

Mangold Park

  • Word of Faith Christian Centre

Millard Grange

  • Lawson Brown High School

Motherwell

  • Dumani Primary School

Newton Park

  • Newton Park Methodist Church

Parsons Hill

  • Parsons Hill Primary
  • St Pauls Church

Richmond Hill

  • PE College Russel Road

Summerstrand

  • Total Garage Admiralty Way

Sunridge Park

  • Cassia Gardens

Uitenhage

  • East Cape Midlands College
  • NG Church Uitenhage East
  • Nasruddin Islamic School

Walmer

  • DF Malherbe
  • Fountain Vineyard
  • Quest School
  • Settlers Park Primary
  • St Johns Church
  • Theodor Herzl Primary
  • Theodor Herzl High
  • Victoria Park High
  • Victoria Park Primary
  • Walmer West Primary
  • Walmer Methodist Church

West End

  • PE College Dower Campus

Westering

  • Westering High

Zwide

  • BJ Mnyanda Primary
  • Khwezi Lomso High
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 October 17, 2016
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Easy Tips for Recycling in the Workplace

BY Vicky du Toit

Fifty percent of your day is spent in the workplace, by taking the steps to ensure that your company’s ecological footprint is lighter, you can reap the benefits of a healthier and more productive working environment...pun intended!
 
Below are a few simple suggestions to make your work day a little more sustainable:
 
Reduce:
 
Have your ecological footprint assessed.  Take into account your carbon emissions, energy and water usage and the amount of waste that you are sending to landfill and put systems in place to reduce these.  Staff could perhaps commute to work, the company could install water dispensers to reduce the usage of plastic bottles and air conditioners can be checked to see if they are being serviced regularly. 
 
Reuse:

  • Reuse as much paper as possible before throwing it in the recycling bin.
  • Purchase rewritable CDs and DVDs so that you can reuse them from project to project.
  • Use refillable pens and ink cartridges.
  • Buy rechargeable batteries. It takes 1000 regular batteries to equal the lifespan of on rechargeable battery.
  • Purchase or make recycled artwork for visual motivation

 
Recycle:
 
To encourage easy and convenient recycling at the office, provide appropriately labelled bins.  Visual motivation is a proven winner! Recycling bins are becoming more widely available.  Encourage staff to select a “green champion” or an “enviroclub” to arrange fun activities and motivate staff.  Beach cleanups are an easy way to raise awareness as well as build moral amongst staff members.  Bring on board a waste management organisation that can assist with training, supplying the bins, collection, and transport and recycling of your office waste.  A good option would be to sign up with The Schools Recycling Project, run by The Waste Trade Company.  The company then has the option to donate their recycling to a school of their choice and so assist the school in raising well needed funds.
 
3R Culture:
 
Reduce, reuse, and recycle!  The first step toward a greener future is education.  Ensure that staff are educated, have the resources and are motivated to sustain a greening project at the workplace.  Remember, small actions can make a big impact!

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 October 10, 2016
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TWTC footprint Aug/Sep 2016 - Innovation in Motion.

BY Vicky du Toit

PORT ELIZABETH, 08 September - The Institute of Waste Management of Southern Africa hosted their first networking cocktail mixer evening for 2016 at the Old Tramways Building.   The agenda commenced with an introduction to the IWMSA by Theo von Ruben, Owner of Chemsolved and also Chairman of the IWMSA Eastern Cape branch.  "The IWMSA is a national nonprofit association whose members are dedicated to supporting professional waste management practices, " Theo explained, "members enjoy benefits such as legislative training, networking and being kept up to date with the latest industry related news."  

 

Theo also informed the audience about the up and coming biannual Top Green Organisations Awards for the Eastern Cape, "The IWMSA, in collaboration with The Department of Economic Development, Environmental Affairs and Tourism, offers organisations the platform to be recognised for their achievements in environmental practice.  We encourage all to submit their entry forms on or before 30th of September."  

 

The Wilderness Foundation Africa Greenleaf Kitchen, who catered for the event, was next to take the stand with Tania Plakonouris, Youth Development Manager, who introduced the audience to the organisation, "Our Umzi Wethu programme includes both a conservation one year course or a one year hospitality chef course.    The organisation focuses on three pillars, species, spaces and people.  Tonight is the perfect example of how we work with people, as all our waiters have only been with us for a month."  Ntobeko Ngcala, senior trails guide then shared his personal tale with the audience, "I had my first real bush experience with The Wilderness Foundation when I was 16 years old, back in 2006.  Through much perseverance and support, I have grown to become a qualified trails guide."  

 

Nelson Mandela University's Mechanical, Electrical and Mechatronics Engineering students attended with their lecturer, Mr Clive Hands, who concluded with a thought provoking presentation about NMU's Eco Car.  "“The current Eco-Car, which weighs 40kg, is undergoing an extensive process of light weighting, which involves optimizing every possible aspect of its design. This involves meticulously removing weight, gram by gram, to make the car even lighter, and hence more efficient. In doing this, the students have applied some quite innovative techniques that, although not externally evident, have resulted in significant improvements already. This is an ongoing, iterative process.”, Clive jokingly added that the driver should be of small frame and not the average South African meat eater.  

 

In conclusion, Clive elaborated on the technological climate and the possible changes to be expected, "We cannot afford to ignore these changes, we need to stay up to date with technology and be proactive." He further explained how the NMMU Eco Car had led them to exploring many other innovative opportunities, "at the moment we are researching the possibility of developing online, recognised courses for industry, where full time workers can have the opportunity to study in their own time and at their own pace."

 

The evening ended with lucky draws and prizes, seeing guests scouting for Theo's business cards under their chairs, "Fostering communication between all stakeholders in the waste industry is one of the IWMSA's goals," added Theo  "events such as these really give our members the platform to build relationships and to grow their networks within the industry.  This is not only beneficial to our members, but to their clients as well."

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 October 01, 2016
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IWMSA Landfill Tours

BY Vicky du Toit

Thursday, 22 September 2016 - Members of The Institute of Waste Management of Southern Africa met at the Enviroserv offices in Port Elizabeth, were treated to informative presentations of both the Aloes Landfill site, as well as the Koedoeskloof Landfill site.  Thereafter, members enjoyed guided tours of both facilities. 


Enviroserv sponsored a delicious brunch, as well as their boardroom facilities for the presentations.  The Waste Trade Company sponsored popcorn for the tours and Tetrapak sponsored water. 


Sue Alcock, operations manager of Enviroserv, opened the event with a presentation about the Aloes HH facility.  This ultra modern facility boasts a reverse osmosis treatment plant, an on-site laboratory and a modern weighbridge.  Furthermore, in accordance with legislative requirements, a double lined cell was constructed in 2014.  This has enabled the facility to provide cost effective solutions to the complex hazardous, non-hazardous and chemical waste problems.  The Aloes HH facility is one of seven such sites managed in South Africa.


Riaan le Roux, Assistant Manager: Disposal at Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality followed with a presentation about Koedoeskloof Landfill site.  This site was constructed in 1989 and started operating in 1992. The site was permitted as a GLB- and Low hazard liquid site. This site originally served the local municipalities of Uitenhage, Kwanobuhle and Despatch. Since the amalgamation of the erstwhile Transitional Local Councils in the Nelson Mandela Metro almost 40% of all waste generated in the NMBM finds its way to this site for disposal. The presentation also covered an overview of the Waste Beneficiation project that is currently out on tender.


"Training sessions such as these are as a result of the relationships built within the IWMSA network," says Theo von Ruben, owner of Chemsolved and Chairperson of the IWMSA Eastern Cape branch, "and we pride ourselves in being able to facilitate educational activities such as these."

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 September 23, 2016
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Innovation in Motion - IWMSA Cocktail Mixer

BY Vicky du Toit

PORT ELIZABETH, 08 September - The Institute of Waste Management hosted their first networking cocktail mixer evening for 2016 at the Old Tramways Building.
 
The agenda commenced with an introduction to the IWMSA by Theo von Ruben, Owner of Chemsolved and also Chairman of the IWMSA Eastern Cape branch.  "The IWMSA is a national nonprofit association whose members are dedicated to supporting professional waste management practices, " Theo explained, "members enjoy benefits such as legislative training, networking and being kept up to date with the latest industry related news."
 
Theo also informed the audience about the up and coming biannual Top Green Organisations Awards for the Eastern Cape, "The IWMSA, in collaboration with The Department of Economic Development, Environmental Affairs and Tourism, offers organisations the platform to be recognised for their achievements in environmental practice.  We encourage all to submit their entry forms on or before 30th of September."
 
The Wilderness Foundation Africa Greenleaf Kitchen, who catered for the event, was next to take the stand with Tania Plakonouris, Youth Development Manager, who introduced the audience to the organisation, "Our Umzi Wethu programme includes both a conservation one year course or a one year hospitality chef course.    The organisation focuses on three pillars, species, spaces and people.  Tonight is the perfect example of how we work with people, as all our waiters have only been with us for a month."  Ntobeko Ngcala, senior trails guide then shared his personal tale with the audience, "I had my first real bush experience with The Wilderness Foundation when I was 16 years old, back in 2006.  Through much perseverance and support, I have grown to become a qualified trails guide."
 
Nelson Mandela University's Mechanical, Electrical and Mechatronics Engineering students attended with their lecturer, Mr Clive Hands, who concluded with a thought provoking presentation about NMU's Eco Car.  "“The current Eco-Car, which weighs 40kg, is undergoing an extensive process of light weighting, which involves optimizing every possible aspect of its design. This involves meticulously removing weight, gram by gram, to make the car even lighter, and hence more efficient. In doing this, the students have applied some quite innovative techniques that, although not externally evident, have resulted in significant improvements already. This is an ongoing, iterative process.”, Clive jokingly added that the driver should be of small frame and not the average South African meat eater.
 
In conclusion, Clive elaborated on the technological climate and the possible changes to be expected, "We cannot afford to ignore these changes, we need to stay up to date with technology and be proactive." He further explained how the NMMU Eco Car had led them to exploring many other innovative opportunities, "at the moment we are researching the possibility of developing online, recognised courses for industry, where full time workers can have the opportunity to study in their own time and at their own pace."
The evening ended with lucky draws and prizes, seeing guests scouting for Theo's business cards under their chairs, "Fostering communication between all stakeholders in the waste industry is one of the IWMSA's goals," added Theo  "events such as these really give our members the platform to build relationships and to grow their networks within the industry.  This is not only beneficial to our members, but to their clients as well."

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 September 12, 2016
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TWTC footprint July 2016 - Take Action.  Inspire Change.  Mandela Day 2016.

BY Vicky du Toit

Once a year, in acknowledgment of the life of the late president, Nelson Mandela, South Africans are encouraged to donate 67 minutes of their time toward social and charitable projects.  The first Mandela Day was celebrated on the 18th of July 2010.  The day was inspired by Madiba at his 90th birthday celebration when he said: "It is time for new hands to lift the burdens.  It is in your hands now." This year, The Waste Trade Company joined forces with Woolworths Baywest and Masake Community Development to clean up the streets of Holland Park, Korsten. 

 

Helen Africa, from Masake, invited learners from Morewag Primary School to attend the cleanup, "most of the children from this area know me personally as they take part in our educational activities and attend our soup kitchens, we were very happy to have 50 learners volunteer their services for the day." The children were split into teams, each with an adult to supervise, and each team was then tasked with a certain street to clean.  Bags and gloves, sponsored by The Waste Trade Company and  Plastics SA, were handed to each team. 

 

After the cleanup, Emmy Nxayeka, Schools Project Coordinator (TWTC) gave the learners an educational talk about the importance of preserving the planet's natural resources, "we really do live the Mandela Day slogan - take action, inspire change and make every day a Mandela Day!". Woolworths Baywest donated soup and bread for lunch as well as goody bags, which their staff handed out personally.  "As we are commited to caring for the environment, our people and communities, we recognised that this was the perfect way to celebrate Mandela Day," says Maryna Verwey, Operations Manager, Woolworths Baywest. 

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 August 01, 2016
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The SPAR Kirkwood Wildsfees - Building Sustainable Partnerships

BY Vicky du Toit

This year, Kirkwood celebrated their 15th Wildsfees with SPAR on board as the naming sponsor.  The festival boasted a variety of activities and adventures for the whole family, as well as ample live entertainment, appetizing food stalls and plenty of crafts and displays.  Apart from offering this unique festival experience, the SPAR Kirkwood Wildsfees also plays a key role in community development.


The Waste Trade Company, in partnership with Mpact Recycling (Pty) Ltd, has had a strong green presence at the festival for the last three years.  Brightly branded recycling stations were placed in high traffic areas all around the festival grounds.  Organic waste bins, as well as grey water and used oil bins were also provided and stall holders had all been briefed about responsible waste management prior to setting up.


St Colmcille High School learners were employed as "Green Ambassadors" for the duration of the festival.  Their responsibilities included educating the public about waste separation, promotional activities with Ronnie Recycler, supervision of all the recycling stations and assisting with further sorting in the waste area.  "The SPAR Kirkwood Wildsfees enables us to expose these learners to the real working world, where they experience the daily challenges of planning, budgeting, and working together as a team.  All the learners are trained by The Waste Trade Company beforehand, and it gives us great pleasure to transfer our skills to them." says Emmy Nxayeka, Schools Project Coordinator from The Waste Trade Company.


Festivals offer many benefits such as skills transfer, attracting tourists, fostering community pride and boosting the local economy.  "Building relationships are crucial to the success of any business," says Kay Hardy, general manager and business partner of The Waste Trade Company, "and the SPAR Kirkwood Wildsfees has provided us the platform to do just that."  As a result of the connections made and relationships built via the SPAR Kirkwood Wildsfees, The Waste Trade Company has opened a recycling depot in Addo which services Kirkwood, Addo and many of the pack houses in the region.  All the staff employed come from the Sundays River Valley community.  The general public can also drop their recycling at schools and other drop off points.  "We were very pleased to have SPAR on board as a naming sponsor, as they are one of our Kirkwood clients," Kay Hardy added.


Mpact Recycling (Pty) Ltd is South Africa’s leading collector of paper and plastics for recycling in South Africa. As such, the company commits resources towards promoting and educating communities on the merits of paper, cartons and PET collection as well as the necessity for recycling for a healthier planet.


“It is through community partnerships like these, with The Waste Trade Company and the Wildsfees team that the recycling message goes further,” says Mpact Recycling’s regional manager Western Cape, Org Van der Wath.


"Through continued focus on schools and communities in which we operate through partners like The Waste Trade Company, we aim to increase our collectable tonnages every year,” continues Van der Wath. “Our hope is that, with the help of communities, schools, and learners that take part in the various recycling programmes, we can achieve even greater numbers for 2016.”

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 July 01, 2016
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TWTC footprint Jun 2016 - Building Sustainable Relationships

BY Vicky du Toit

This year, Kirkwood celebrated their 15th Wildsfees with SPAR on board as the naming sponsor.  The festival boasted a variety of activities and adventures for the whole family, as well as ample live entertainment, appetizing food stalls and plenty of crafts and displays. 

 

Apart from offering this unique festival experience, the SPAR Kirkwood Wildsfees also plays a key role in community development. The Waste Trade Company, in partnership with Mpact Recycling (Pty) Ltd, has had a strong green presence at the festival for the last three years. 

 

Brightly branded recycling stations were placed in high traffic areas all around the festival grounds.  Organic waste bins, as well as grey water and used oil bins were also provided and stall holders had all been briefed about responsible waste management prior to setting up. St Colmcille High School learners were employed as "Green Ambassadors" for the duration of the festival.  Their responsibilities included educating the public about waste separation, promotional activities with Ronnie Recycler, supervision of all the recycling stations and assisting with further sorting in the waste area.  "The SPAR Kirkwood Wildsfees enables us to expose these learners to the real working world, where they experience the daily challenges of planning, budgeting, and working together as a team.  All the learners are trained by The Waste Trade Company beforehand, and it gives us great pleasure to transfer our skills to them." says Emmy Nxayeka, Schools Project Coordinator from The Waste Trade Company.

 

Festivals offer many benefits such as skills transfer, attracting tourists, fostering community pride and boosting the local economy.  "Building relationships are crucial to the success of any business," says Kay Hardy, General Manager and business partner of The Waste Trade Company, "and the SPAR Kirkwood Wildsfees has provided us the platform to do just that."  As a result of the connections made and relationships built via the SPAR Kirkwood Wildsfees, The Waste Trade Company has opened a recycling depot in Addo which services Kirkwood, Addo and many of the pack houses in the region.  All the staff employed come from the Sundays River Valley community.  The general public can also drop their recycling at schools and other drop off points.  "We were very pleased to have SPAR on board as a naming sponsor, as they are one of our Kirkwood clients," Kay Hardy added.

 

Mpact Recycling (Pty) Ltd is South Africa’s leading collector of paper and plastics for recycling in South Africa. As such, the company commits resources towards promoting and educating communities on the merits of paper, cartons and PET collection as well as the necessity for recycling for a healthier planet. “It is through community partnerships like these, with The Waste Trade Company and the Wildsfees team that the recycling message goes further,” says Mpact Recycling’s Regional Manager Western Cape, Org Van der Wath. "Through continued focus on schools and communities in which we operate through partners like The Waste Trade Company, we aim to increase our collectable tonnages every year,” continues Van der Wath. “Our hope is that, with the help of communities, schools and learners that take part in the various recycling programmes, we can achieve even greater numbers for 2016.” 

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 July 01, 2016
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TWTC footprint May 2016 - Go Wild for Life

BY Vicky du Toit

Every year, on the 5th of June, environmentalists across the globe join forces to raise awareness about the importance of caring for our planet.  Sustainable consumption, marine pollution, global warming and wildlife crime are but a few of the themes explored. 

 

This year's theme explored the illicit trade of wildlife products.  The WED encourages the general public to register events online and share their efforts in order to raise awareness. In the spirit of going wild for life, TWTC Waste Warriors put their tribal war paint on, and supported the Something Good Beach Cleanup for World Environment Day. 

 

Emmy Nxayeka was the strongest climber for the day and was always seen on the top of the dunes "It is really surprising to see how littered the beaches actually are once you make an effort to clean up, people forget that every little bit of plastic stuck under a bush can poison marine life." Plastic bags and bottles, sweet wrappers, foil packets, polystyrene food containers, glass, cigarette butts, tissues, used plastic cutlery and cans were all examples of waste collected on the beach. 

 

To our surprise, even members of the public who were not volunteering at the cleanup, started picking up litter as they walked on the beach.  "This is exactly what we want to achieve by supporting clean up campaigns.  One can only make a real difference when leading by example. " - Kay Hardy, General Manager, The Waste Trade Company 

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 June 01, 2016
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World Environment Day 2016

BY Vicky du Toit

Consider the word "wild" and what it means to you.  Thoughts that come to mind might include natural, native, fierce, untouched.  The Oxford defines wild as the following:


"(Of an animal or plant) living or growing in the natural environment; not domesticated or cultivated."


As human civilisation has evolved, we have forgotten our dependence on the natural environment, and in the current day the human race is faced with serious problems such as climate change, the depletion of natural resources and the extinction of wildlife.  Still the scale tips in favour of convenience, power and greed.


It is so easy to overcomplicate the concept of sustainable living, yet the answer lies in keeping it simple.  Changing our mindsets.  Embracing our wild nature.


Key Elements in Changing Your Mindset:


Knowledge - what is known, cannot be unknown.  Research current environmental developments.  Follow relevant institutions on social media.  The more you are exposed to environmental news and motivational messages, the more aware you will be of your every day actions.


Commitment - set goals and objectives for yourself, or your company.  Consider the simple steps you can take to reduce your environmental footprint.  Recycle your waste, reduce your usage of water and electricity, buy local produce, support environmental causes.


Positivity - humans instinctively resist change, but change is needed to save our planet.  Instead of complaining about inconvenience, consider that every action has an environmental impact - make yours positive.

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 May 25, 2016
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